479-422-0390Call (479) 422-0390 for immediate assistance

Does It Matter What Language Your Servos Use? 0

Posted on 26, February 2018

in Category Uncategorized

It depends what you mean by languages. On the one hand, some servo motors (and drives and controls) have to be programmed in specific machine languages. This can be an issue. The last guy who really knew the programming language for that system installed in 1987 has already retired. Now what?

This is why Rexroth has come up with solutions for ease of communication. For one thing, the Rexroth Open Core system makes it possible for engineers to program in the machine languages with which they are most comfortable. There’s also a library of programs which allow configuration of motion control systems with no programming at all.

This may not be a solution for legacy Rexroth components, if machine language or programming language is the issue.You might need to give us a call. We can communicate with your machinery perfectly.

Can your machinery communicate with you?

This is the second possibility if we’re talking about the language used by your motion control systems. You may want a different human language.

Your troubleshooting manual, diagnostic messages, and error codes could be in a language that you don’t understand. Or in English, when your engineer would be more comfortable in Spanish.

Certainly, if you’ve picked up a servo on eBay, you have equal chances of getting a foreign language as of getting English.

The solution is simple.

First, for your drive controller, you can pick the language you want… as long as you want one of the major European languages.

Start on the main screen. You’ll see a prompt “DE/EN/<“; go ahead and press the key The screen for setting the language will show up.
Press “Prog+” or “Mon” key and you’ll see a list of languages:

  • 0: German
  • 1: English
  • 2: French
  • 3: Italian
  • 4: Spanish

Only the available languages will be show, and they will be identified by an abbreviation. “DE,” short for “Deutsch,” signifies German. The other languages are shown with the first two letters of their names in English. Coincidentally, for all the languages but Spanish, this is also the first two letters of the language’s name in the native language. So, “EN” is for English, “FR” is for French (and Français), and “IT” is for both Italian and Italiano.

Don’t go looking for “ES” for Español, though, because you won’t find it. “SP” is for Spanish.

Once you’ve selected a language, press Enter and you’re set.